Knowledge Base

Information regarding long term care provision in Guernsey

QUESTION

I have a query relating to care home provision in Guernsey.

I can see that the scheme is dependent on contributions having been paid by the individual during their working lives and a minimum residence period in Gnsy of 5 yrs (and 12m immediately before claiming).  Also eligibilitydepending on assessment by HSSD.

I can also see that the payment of long term care would consist of a) a co-payment per week by the resident, b) a long term care benefit paid by the States scheme and c) a top up if the care home fees exceed a) plus b).  Also, that where residents cannot afford the co-payment that supplementary benefit is available.

My question is, how do the States assess whether you can afford the co-payment.  I can see that they discount ownership of your own home, but do they look at your other assets / savings?  What happens if you have gifted away cash to family in the years prior to going into the care home?

Also where do the States care homes come into the picture versus the private homes?

 

ANSWER (Gerald from Hermanus)

Briefly YES you need to have less than 3000 in your bank account to receive state assistance. Hence many many people 'gift away' assets (ie.Houses) and savings to their families before these decisions are reached so as to claim maximum benefit from the state.

HSSD as such has no care homes (except Duchess of Kent) but this I believe is about to change regarding King Edward and Corbinerie units. However is still a minefield. Social Insurance also has its own two ...Maison Maritaine and Long Rue but how this will work in the future in unknown. These two homes are not inspected or staffed as the ones under HSSD.

Reworded for use in email etc.

The scheme is dependent on contributions having been paid by the individual during their working lives and a minimum residence period in Gnsy of 5 yrs (and 12m immediately before claiming).  Also eligibility depends on a needs assessment by HSSD and there are three categories depending on how extensive the needs are.

The payment of long term care consists of a) a co-payment per week by the resident, b) a long term care benefit paid by the States scheme (there appear to be three differing amounts depending on the needs assessment and the type of care category thus allocated) and c) a top up if the care home fees exceed a) plus b).  Also, that where the residents cannot afford to pay the co-payment supplementary benefit is available.

In order to assess whether the resident can afford the co-payment they need to have £3,000 or more in their bank account (the ownership of their own home is discounted specifically under the insurance scheme law).  If they have £3,000 or less then the States will pay the co-payment via supplementary benefit.  It is apparently relatively common, therefore, for older people to gift away their assets and savings.  The long term care benefit itself is available to all and not means tested.